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Walking Holidays In Pembrokeshire

St Dogmaels - Amroth. The Pembrokeshire Coast Path Walk
Spanning 186 miles in total, the breathtaking Pembrokeshire Coast Path twists and turns its way from St Dogmaels in North Pembrokeshire, just south- west of Cardigan Bay, down to the South Pembrokeshire coast in Amroth, north-east of Saundersfoot. There are many trails and tracks to be discovered – hundreds in fact! For all ages and abilities, whether strolling with pushchairs on a family break, trekking with Fido on your dog friendly holiday or simply taking in all the beautiful scenery that Pembrokeshire has to offer on a romantic weekend break for two – you could not have found a better place for walking holidays in Wales.

Bwlch Gwynt – Foel Eryr – Tafarn Y Bwlch – Bwlch Gwynt Walk
The ancient Preseli Hills stand proudly as part of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, widely known as an area of outstanding natural beauty. Situated south-east of Fishguard and to the north of Rosebush, the ideal destination for those of you looking for an uninterrupted walking holiday or short break to get away from it all and get back to nature! One of the most popular trails starts at Bwlch Gwynt, on to Foel Eryr, then over to Tafarn Y Bwlch and back to Bwlch Gwynt, an ideal attraction whilst on your dog friendly holiday. This enchanting circular route is well worth the trek – steeped in natural history and many an opportunity to follow an ancient footpath, adding some adventure to your route. Whether on a romantic break for two or a self catering holiday for all the family – everyone is sure to enjoy!

Ceibwr Bay - Pembrokeshire Coast Path - Pwllygranant Walk
Resting at its vantage point on the magnificent craggy cliff tops, to the east of Newport Sands and to the most nrthern point on the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, Ceibwr Bay, the largest beach on the North Pembrokeshire Coast, elaborately unfolds at the foot of the steep cliffs with its pebbly bay and a small meandering river extending in to the choppy Irish Sea. From this elevated position is where this walking holiday adventure begins, but, before you descend on your journey – be sure to take stock of the stunning scenery that beholds you from this perch. You may even be able to glimpse the Bottlenose Dolphins and Atlantic Grey Seals that call this area home. With so many wonders to behold, you will surely find something fascinating, whatever your interest

Goodwick - Pen Anglas - Ciliau Farm- Goodwick Walk
This meandering walk uses part of the Pembrokeshire Coast Path as its outbound trail, taking you to Pen Anglas - The coastline of Strumble Head was moulded many moons ago by volcanic activity. Pen Anglas has a fine example of the same type of rock formations that can be admired at the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland. Pen Anglas will also delight wildlife watchers, displaying an impressive wealth of coastal heath land and Sea Birds that can be seen gliding across the open sky. But on your homeward bound journey you will navigate an old sunken lane enjoying stunning scenic views and discovering an ancient burial ground!

Lower Fishguard - Lower Gwaun Valley- Lower Fishguard Walk.
Let us begin our journey in Lower Fishguard, part of the market town of Fishguard, a quintessential fishing village with a pretty tidal quay. In Welsh, Fishguard translates as Abergwaun, meaning "Mouth of the River Gwaun” an ideal name as it is located where the River Gwaun meets the sea set deep inside the valley, hence the Welsh name. Lower Fishguard is thought to be the original Hamlet of where the town of modern day Fishguard first began. Steeped in history, during the Viking Era the coasts of Wales were subject to many Norse (modern day Scandinavian) raids, and during the 10th century Norse trading posts and settlements emerged within the county, with Fishguard being established around 1000 AD. The modern day English name Fishguard derives from the old Norse word fiskigarðr meaning "fish catching enclosure"...

Bosherston Lily Ponds - Near Stackpole. Pembrokeshire Coast Path Walk
Stackpole is situated on the south coast of Pembrokeshire, to the west of Manorbier. This area and the stretch of coast line that is Barafundle Bay, are regarded as a listed designed landscape, and area of natural beauty, due to the Bosherston Lily Ponds (or Lakes as they are otherwise known). The Lily Ponds were created over 200 years ago as backdrop for the former Stackpole Court – a grand mansion house that unfortunately got demolished before the National Trust took ownership of the area. There are many footpaths spanning out from the site of the former Stackpole Court that will help you to explore. Ideal for those of you on a walking holiday or if looking for a place of interest whilst on a dog friendly holiday.

Plumstone Mountain - Pembrokeshire Walk
For those of you looking for the perfect walking holiday, your journey begins North of Haverfordwest at the foot of Plumstone Mountain. A fantastic walk and vantage point offering vistas of rolling hills and farmland as well as views over to the Preseli Hills in the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. Truly steeped in history, this walk will take you past the remains of an Iron Age Fort, then across a common, clad with Heather and Welsh Gorse, a great spot for a bit of bird watching as this common is a favourite hunting ground for Owls, Harriers and Buzzards. Further on into your walk, as you reach the Causeway Plantation, take your time to look out for the Long Tailed Tits, Goldcrests and Tree Creepers that frequent the Pine and Spruce trees here, but be careful to watch out for Adders, Lizards, Foxes and Badgers that rustle around amongst the woodland floor.

The Forestry Commission Minwear Wood Walk
Beneath the historic shelter of ancient oaks, ash and hazel trees and more recent additions of fir and spruce, are gems of trails lined and bordered by magical bluebells, foxgloves, wood spurge, wild thyme and many other beautiful hedgerow plants with butterflies flitting from flower to flower. The perfect setting for those of you who are looking for a dog friendly holiday, what could be a better way of entertaining Fido than with a relaxing short break for you both! For those of you really wanting to step off the beaten track and get away from it all whilst on your coastal holiday in Pembrokeshire - Steeped in history, betwixt the south west of Narberth and the north west of Templeton, lies the ancient woodland of Canaston and Minwear. Historically important and noted for hundreds of years, some of the smaller trees within the woods were once used as firewood for the Slebech estate, but the mighty oaks were left to grow so that they could be used for building ships in the harbours of Tenby and Saundersfoot Bay.

Toch Woods and Slebech Walk
For those of you wanting to get away from it all whilst on your coastal holiday in Pembrokeshire - Steeped in history, south west of Narberth and the north west of Templeton, lies the ancient woodland of Minwear. Historically important and noted for hundreds of years, some of the smaller trees within the woods were once used as firewood for the Slebech estate, but the mighty oaks were left to grow so that they could be used for building ships in the harbours of Tenby and Saundersfoot Bay. The ideal setting for a walking holiday! Dating as far back as the 17th century the woodlands were formally part of the Slebech Estate. A great find for the avid wildlife watcher - the woods are home to grey squirrels, badgers and foxes. The epitome of tranquillity and a vision of calm and peace, perfect for an after dinner stroll on romantic weekend break... or for the wildlife watchers amongst us.

Blackpool Mill - The Leat Walk Disabled Access Walk
Stepping off the beaten track whilst on your coastal holiday in Pembrokeshire - Steeped in history, south west of Narberth and the north west of Templeton, lies the ancient woodland of Minwear. Historically important and noted for hundreds of years, some of the smaller trees within the woods were once used as firewood for the Slebech estate, but the mighty oaks were left to grow so that they could be used for building ships in the harbours of Tenby and Saundersfoot Bay long ago. The ideal setting for a walking holiday with disabled access! Dating as far back as the 17th century the woodlands were formally part of the Slebech Estate. A great find for the avid wildlife watcher amongst us - the woods are home to various species of wildlfe, such as grey squirrels, badgers and foxes.

Abereiddi – Porthgain Walk
Starting our coastal walk, situated on the northern tip of the Pembrokeshire Coastline our journey begins in Abereiddi, and let me tell you, the scenery doesn't get much better than this! Boasting soaring cliff tops and the craggy volcanic peaks of Pen Beri and Carn Llidi to name just a few. Abereiddi beach is renowned for its black sand which is filled with tiny fossils, it is also one of Pembrokeshire's pebble backed storm beaches. All the pebble banks were created by a huge storm in 1859. Another gem to look out for is The Blue Lagoon in Abereiddi, which is a flooded slate quarry - you will be able to reach this via a pathway passing ruined quarry buildings and slate workers' cottages.

Abermawr – Pwllderi Walk
Our journey begins in Abermawr, trailing through lush fields the track passes the beautiful beach at Pwllcrochan and from here it is an uphill climb, passing soaring craggy cliffs as the path curves around the beach at Pwllderi. Abermawr is a stretch of the Pembrokeshire coastline that is regarded as a Site of Special Scientific Interest. Abermawr is a mostly shingle beach with some marsh and a woodland behind it. The large pebble bank of the bay was created by a storm on the 25th of October 1859.

Altycoed - Poppit Sands Walk Perfect for a gentle stroll with beautiful vistas aplenty, beginning at Alltycoed farm, which is ideally placed on the Pembrokeshire Coastal Path, with far reaching views over the Teifi estuary at Poppit Sands and Cardigan Island. Maybe perfect for an evening’s meander as this trail looks out to the sunset, visible at the top fields by the old coastguard lookout hut, or maybe a mornings stroll during sunrise! Heading south east along the coastline towards Poppit Sands, a pretty sandy beach on the west coast of Wales, backed with sand dunes at the mouth of the Teifi Estuary. It is also the start (or the finish if reversed) of the Pembrokshire coastal path to Amroth which is over 180 miles away. .

Angle Church - Angle Picnic Site Walk Angle is a village located on a narrow peninsula on the very south west tip of Wales in Pembrokeshire. A typical village, having two public houses, a school, a post office, a castle, St Mary's church and a sandy beach to the west. The nearest railway station is in Pembroke, from where there is a bus link to the village. The Angle lifeboat received silver medals in 1878 for rescuing the crew of the Loch Shiel from rocks near Thorn Island. The ship had been carrying a cargo of whisky and beer! Let’s hope that the crew hadn’t been drinking their cargo!

Broad Haven - Nolton Haven Walk
Situated on the Pembrokeshire Coastline of St. Brides Bay lies Broad Haven, Just West of Haverfordwest and to the North of Milford Haven. Broad Haven (Welsh translation: Aber Llydan) is a village in the south east corner of St Bride's Bay at the terminus of the B4341 in south Pembrokeshire. Broad Haven is part of the Havens division of Pembrokeshire County Council. It is a pretty little seaside resort with a large west-facing Blue Flag beach offering safe bathing for families on a beach break and good surfing, windsurfing and sailing opportunities for the more adventurous souls. The north end of Broad Haven beach has a number of interesting geological features including folding, stacks and natural arches. A RNLI lifeboat was once stationed at Little Haven from 1882 to 1921. In 1967 the station was reopened with an inshore lifeboat and the station name changed to Little & Broad Haven

Broad Haven South - St Govans Walk
Broad Haven South is a beach located 1 mile south east of the village of Bosherston on the edge of the Stackpole Estate in South Pembrokeshire in Wales. It is one of Pembrokeshire's finest beaches in terms of the water quality, its south-facing location and dramatic cliff views backed by sand dunes, expansive National Trust woodland and Lily Ponds which are located behind the beach Nearby, the golden sandy beach at Broad Haven South is beautiful and backs on to the fabulous lily ponds at Bosherston - a haven for plants and wildlife. The majority of this walk is flat with a few steeper climbs to and from the beaches. The scenery along this coast is breathtaking and you should definitely try to visit the historic chapel tucked into the bottom of the cliffs at St Govan's Head

Angle Picnic Site - Pembroke Power Station Walk
This short gentle path continues through a forest and around West Angle Bay, passing an old lime kiln until you reach the picnic site where you can stop for a well-earned break, refreshments and sample all the sights on offer to you! Continuing towards Fort Popton, where the scenery begins to draw the eye to the oil refineries overlooking the still beautiful coast line. Popton Fort is a Grade II Listed Building known as a Palmerston fort completed in 1864 as part of the inner line of defence of Milford Haven together with Fort Hubberstone on the opposite bank. The forts were built during the Victorian period on the recommendations of the 1860 Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom, following concerns about the strength of the French Navy. The name comes from their association with Lord Palmerston, who was Prime Minister at the time and promoted the idea. Popton Fort comprises of two batteries, Moncrieff Battery on the west side and Open Battery on the north. The fort was abandoned at the start of the 20th century but it was used again during the Second World War.

Caerfai - St Justinians Walk
Caerfai Bay near St Davids in Pembrokeshire has commanding cliffs of purple sandstone and a sandy beach at low tide that can be reached by steep steps. There is free parking above the beach with picnic benches and views of the islands of Skomer and Skokholm. The cliffs have distinctive purple red sandstone of the type used for building St Davids Cathedral. St David's is also a base for walking and water sports. It has several hotels and a number of pubs. The entire coastline around St David's forms part of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. The St David's lifeboat, located at St Justinian, has saved an estimated 360 people since the first lifeboat was located there in 1869 and four lifeboat men have died while saving others. The Irish Sea area includes a large number of offshore rocks and islands and is notorious for strong tides.

Abercastle - Cwm Badau Walk
Abercastle is a pretty coastal village in Pembrokeshire, situated betwixt St. David’s and Fishguard on the North Coast. The perfect spot for a quiet stroll whilst admiring the boats on the bay. Abercastle has a working harbour which is managed by Abercastle Boat Owners Association. History fans take note - Alfred Johnson, an American, landed in Abercastle on 12th August 1876 - the first man to cross the Atlantic Ocean single-handedly by boat. Starting your trail on the West side of the bay, this route meanders past the harbour, which was used by small trading vessels until well into the last century.